“What fun we’ll have, amid such pidgeons!”: Rimbaud in Translation

by Jacob Sunderlin, Co-Editor of Poetry One hundred and fifty-seven years ago today, a  provocateur was born in France.  Arthur Rimbaud—published by fifteen, retired by twenty, dead by forty—wrote famously in 1871: “I’m now making myself as scummy as I can. Why? I want to be a poet, and I’m working at turning myself into … Continue reading “What fun we’ll have, amid such pidgeons!”: Rimbaud in Translation

Introducing Poetry Co-Editor Jacob Sunderlin

by Jacob Sunderlin, Poetry Co-Editor Hello Internet.  I’m a third year writer in the MFA program at Purdue University, who has been variously employed as a hod thrower, line cook, bread baker, newspaper ad-stuffer, tutor, teacher, and banjo enthusiast (examples and better listening found here).  This summer, I’m shoveling rocks and dirt into a rock-and-dirt sifter … Continue reading Introducing Poetry Co-Editor Jacob Sunderlin

Does the Story in Your Heart Involve a Donkey?: Maurice Manning’s Common Man

BY JACOB SUNDERLIN Maurice Manning—the ol’ dog—knows a trick or two, so it is a testament to the strength of his newest book, The Common Man, that the poems become much more than the sum of their accomplished techniques, speakers, one-liners, and anecdotes, and that they stand alone as individual soldiers as well as a … Continue reading Does the Story in Your Heart Involve a Donkey?: Maurice Manning’s Common Man