Tagged Interview

Writing YA: An Interview with Patricia Henley & Elizabeth Stuckey-French

Written by Natalie Lund Earlier this fall, I found out that Patricia Henley and Elizabeth Stuckey-French co-authored a young adult novel, Where Wicked Starts. I’ve always loved reading YA, but I was especially excited to hear about this publication because Henley and Stuckey-French have both been a part of my education as a writer. My first year in Purdue’s MFA…

Meditation & Mentorship: An Interview with Ruth Ozeki

I’d never written a fan letter, but after finishing Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale for the Time-Being and enduring a series of events procuring the book that seemed straight of Ozekiland (a library adventure, a doppelgänger, a loss, a recovery), I wrote to Ozeki and asked if she would speak to me. I was completely unsurprised, and delighted, that she agreed. I am a poet haunted by the right ways to wrangle with questions of identity, biculturalism, hybridity, Asian-ness, Americanness, femininity, feminism, mothers, aging. I’m haunted by questions of whether the airless unit of language can convert something as complex as…

Witness & Scrutiny: An Interview with John W. Evans

John W. Evans’s memoir Young Widower (University of Nebraska Press, $19.95) begins with the author imagining his place in a bookshop’s self-help aisle. Here he finds the cloying jargon, the “wistful elders look[ing] out plaintively from dust jackets,” but nothing that resonates with his experience: his wife, Katie, was mauled by a bear while the couple was hiking in the Carpathian Mountains. She was 30, Evans 29. Wandering the aisle, Evans says, “I tried to imagine the subsection where I would find some particular instruction after Katie’s death: Personal Growth- Grief- Animal Attack- Bear- Coward Personal Growth- Grief- Young Widower- Survivor-…

The Motor City & The Vehicle City: Talking to Mark Binelli in Flint, Michigan

In 1989, Michael Moore’s Roger & Me announced the death of the auto industry in my hometown, the birthplace of General Motors, Flint, Michigan. In the film, Moore travels back and forth from Flint to General Motor’s Detroit headquarters, demanding Chairman Roger Smith come confront Flint’s 30,000 unemployed auto workers. Unable to talk to Smith,…

When I Finish Praying: A Conversation with Joe Hall

By David Blomenberg Joe Hall’s second book of poetry, The Devotional Poems, is recently out from Black Ocean.  While he was in the beginning stages of his book tour, I got a chance to ask him a few questions about it. David Blomenberg:  Congratulations on the second book!  Tell me about the tour you’ve got…

A Conversation with Poet A. E. Watkins: The Metamorphosis of a Manuscript

By David Blomenberg, Reviews Editor Moving from a collection of various poems to a book manuscript is a strange, intuitive, almost spooky process.  What brings a collection together?  Recently I sat down with poet A. E. Watkins to talk with him about the genesis and metamorphosis of the manuscript of his first book, Dear, Companion, recently published by Dream Horse Press. The book is centered on Allerton Park in Illinois through the seasons while at the same time details the development of a relationship. David Blomenberg:  You of course were publishing poems before this book.  Those are different.  What was…

‘Insert the poetic where we’d least expect it’: An Interview with artist and poet Mary Flanagan

By Eric Goddard-Scovel, Guest Contributor Introduction Mary Flanagan is an innovative multimedia artist, poet, designer and scholar constantly pushing the boundaries of what art, literature, and games can do in our ever-evolving digital culture. She is the Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor in Digital Humanities at Dartmouth College and author most recently ofCritical Play: Radical Game Design (2009). She is also the founding director of Tiltfactor, a lab focused on “game design for social change.” The first work of Mary Flanagan’s I had the pleasure to encounter was her interactive poem [theHouse] (see Figure 1 below), which appeared alongside a range…

Jazz Odyssey Acid Trips: Matthew Dickman Answers a Few Questions Before He Is Urgently Lead Away to a “Reception”

By Rosalie Moffett, Blog Editor Last night, I and two of my cohort drove through the sunset on a little two-lane highway that felt especially middle-of-nowhere, even for Indiana. We drove to Depauw University, to a building so glassy and lit up it looked more like a mothership than a “performing arts center.” This was where we saw Matthew Dickman, poetry editor at Tin House magazine, and author of Mayakovsky’s Revolver, his new second book of poems, read. While it should be noted that there are Dairy Queens in every other town around, there are none in Greencastle, Indiana. Nonetheless,…

Another Bullshit Night In Indiana: An Interview with Nick Flynn

SR Ed.: In honor of the debut of the film “Being Flynn,” the adaptation of Nick Flynn’s memoir Another Bullshit Night in Suck City, we are reposting our 2006 interview with him. An honest writer will let you get close to him. He can’t help it. He’ll let you see his embarrassments, his poor choices, the ignorance of himself and those closest to him, and, if you read carefully enough, you’ll see yourself and feel the best of all feelings: hope. Nick Flynn is a great writer, an honest writer. His memoir, Another Bullshit Night in Suck City (Norton, 2004),…

“A ‘real’ dystopic future”: An Interview with Miriam Bird Greenberg

by Corey Van Landingham, Poetry Co-Editor We were lucky enough to be able to ask Miriam some questions about her poem “It’s Hard to Forget,” which will run in the forthcoming issue of Sycamore Review. Check out Miriam talking about pica, world-making, and her manuscript All night in the new country. Sycamore Review: Where did the material for”It’s Hard to Remember” come from? Is it part of a larger project, and, if so, how does this particular poem fit into that larger scope? Miriam Bird Greenberg: This is part of a book-length manuscript of poems called All night in the new…