Review: William Brewer’s I Know Your Kind

Review: William Brewer's I Know Your Kind By Caleb Milne William Brewer’s first full length manuscript, I Know Your Kind, selected as the National Poetry Series Winner by Ada Limón, mythically and vividly recounts, while personally accounting for, the opioid crisis as it sweeps, and is sweeping, through Appalachia and the nation. The collection sets … Continue reading Review: William Brewer’s I Know Your Kind

Review: Roy Jacobsen’s Borders

Review: Roy Jacobsen’s Borders by Jeff Amos Roy Jacobsen’s Borders begins with the whimsical anecdote of a miller’s attempt to construct a small footbridge over the Our River between Luxembourg and Germany, but swells into a tale of history, family, and identity in a community of fluid borders. Set primarily in a small valley in … Continue reading Review: Roy Jacobsen’s Borders

Jamaal May’s The Big Book of Exit Strategies

Review By: Bess Cooley, Managing Editor Birds searching for bread. A fist fight. Fences. Lampposts. All these in the first two poems, immediately setting up Jamaal May’s second poetry collection, The Big Book of Exit Strategies. This is an urban book, a book of city landscapes—particularly Detroit, the author’s hometown. The second poem in this … Continue reading Jamaal May’s The Big Book of Exit Strategies

After the Fire: Bill Morris’ Motor City Burning

Bill Morris’ new novel, Motor City Burning (Pegasus Books), begins on Opening Day at Tiger Stadium.  It’s 1968, nearly a year since the race riots ravaged Detroit, and five days since the death of Martin Luther King Jr. This immediate submersion into baseball-and-hot-dog Americana and fraught historical context establish the duality of Morris’s novel: Motor … Continue reading After the Fire: Bill Morris’ Motor City Burning

Michael Mlekoday: The Dead Eat Everything, Including this Review

First course: some “bathtub gin,” Baba’s dice left on the kitchen table, all the malt liquor poured out for loved ones. Second course: the roughage of “every page of the bible” to cleanse the pallet. The main course, the whole enchilada: “a city so ruined, it is perfect” with julienned pit bull—a mornay of “gunmetal … Continue reading Michael Mlekoday: The Dead Eat Everything, Including this Review